From 9 January 2013 all sales or lettings advertisements in the commercial media should show the EPC rating of the property being advertised. There is no requirement to display the full certificate but where there is adequate space, the advertisement should show the A-G graph. However, it is recognised that this will not always be
possible. In such cases the advertisement should include the actual EPC rating of the property (for example C).
However, in line with the removal of unnecessary gold-plating, from 9 January 2013, there will no longer be any requirement to attach the front page of the EPC to any written materials.
When a prospective buyer or tenant registers an interest in a property (by arranging a viewing or requesting further details), the seller or landlord must make sure a copy of the property’s EPC is available to them (if one has been produced). This should be in whichever format the prospective buyer or tenant has requested (e.g. hard copy or
electronically as a document or web link).
Often a landlord or seller will use an agent to manage the letting or sales process. If this is the case the lettings or estate agent will provide the prospective tenant or buyer with the EPC. However it remains the ultimate responsibility of the landlord/seller to make sure this is done.
On all occasions the landlord or seller is obliged to give prospective tenants or buyers a copy of the EPC before any contract has been entered into.

The EPC must always be made available to prospective tenants or buyers free of chargeRequirement to provide an EPC when building, selling or renting out a dwelling
An EPC is required whenever a building is built, sold, or let to a new tenant. This requirement was introduced in stages, beginning on 1 August 2007.
An EPC is only required for a dwelling that is self contained – i.e. one that it does not share essential facilities such as a bathroom/shower room, wc or kitchen with any other dwelling, and that it has its own entrance, either from outside or through common parts, that is not through another unit.

EPC requirements
Requirement to provide an EPC when building, selling or renting out a dwelling
An EPC is required whenever a building is built, sold, or let to a new tenant. This requirement was introduced in stages, beginning on 1 August 2007.
An EPC is only required for a dwelling that is self contained – i.e. one that it does not share essential facilities such as a bathroom/shower room, wc or kitchen with any other dwelling, and that it has its own entrance, either from outside or through common parts, that is not through another unit.

Existing dwellings
The purpose of the EPC is to show prospective tenants or buyers the energy performance of the dwelling they are considering. Therefore, the landlord or seller
must commission an EPC and ensure that a copy of it is available free of charge to interested parties at the earliest opportunity. As a minimum, this should be when
prospective tenants or buyers are first given written information about a dwelling or are arranging to view it.
A copy of the EPC must be always given free of charge to the person who ultimately becomes the tenant or the new owner of a property, before any contract is entered into.
An EPC does not have to be made available if the seller or prospective landlord believes on reasonable grounds that:
• the prospective buyer or tenant is unlikely to have sufficient funds to purchase the building or is not genuinely interested in buying or renting a building of that type
• the seller or prospective landlord is unlikely to be prepared to sell or rent the building to the prospective buyer or tenant. However this does not authorise
unlawful discrimination
Where the landlord or seller has an agent, the agent may be given the task of ensuring that these requirements are met. However, the landlord or seller will remain
responsible for any breaches.

New dwellings
When a new dwelling is constructed and is physically complete, it is the responsibility of the person carrying out the construction to give an Energy Performance Certificate (full standard assessment procedure or SAP EPC) to the building owner and to notify building control that this has been done. Building control will not issue a certificate of completion until they are satisfied this has been done.
Similarly, if a dwelling is modified to have more or fewer parts than it originally had and the modification includes the provision or extension of fixed services for heating, air conditioning or mechanical ventilation (i.e. those services that condition the indoor climate for the benefits of the occupants) then a full SAP EPC will be required. When the modifications are physically complete, it is the responsibility of the person carrying out the modification works to give a full SAP EPC to the building owner and to notify building control that this has been done. Building control will not issue a certificate of completion until they are satisfied this has been done.
An EPC relates to a single dwelling, so if a building is converted such that it will contain more, or fewer, separate dwellings than before, a new full SAP EPC will be
required in relation to each new self contained dwelling.

Situations where an EPC is not required
EPCs are not required on sale or rent for buildings due to be demolished, provided the seller or landlord can demonstrate that:
• the building is to be sold or rented out with vacant possession
• the building is suitable for demolition and
• the resulting site is suitable for redevelopment
• all relevant planning permissions, listed building consents and conservation area consents exist in relation to the demolition, and
• they believe, on reasonable grounds, that a prospective buyer or tenant intends to demolish the building (e.g. on evidence of an application for planning permission)
Additionally, in line with the removal of unnecessary gold-plating, from 9 January 2013, the following types of buildings will not require an EPC:
• buildings and monuments officially protected as part of a designated environment or because of special architectural or historic merit in so far as compliance with certain energy efficiency requirements would unacceptably alter character or appearance
• buildings used as places of worship and for religious activities
• temporary buildings with a planned time of use of two years or less
• residential buildings which are intended to be used less than four months of the year
• stand-alone buildings with a total useful floor area of less than 50m²

Validity period
If an EPC has already been produced for a property, this EPC can be re-used for future sales or rental of the property. EPCs are valid for 10 years from the date of their
production and can be re-used as many times as required within that period.
If a new EPC is lodged, this then becomes the only valid one. EPCs are not invalidated by renovation works or improvements. However, a landlord or seller may wish to obtain a new certificate to demonstrate the energy efficiency improvements to potential tenants/ buyers.

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